Posts Tagged With: beef

Bacon-Wrapped Peppered Sirloin

We have been enjoying some blissfully cool-for-August temperatures lately and this weather gift has inspired me to heat up the old Green Egg after a long hiatus. I am still adjusting back to post-vacation life, aka feeling a little lazy.  (I tell my son that vacation wouldn’t be special if we had it all the time. I so lie to that boy.) Anyway, I was looking for something pretty simple to ease my way back into real life.

I had some lovely jalapeno bacon in the freezer from a trip awhile back to Hirsch’s Specialty Meats. I wasn’t sure what I was making but I was pretty darn sure it would be wrapped with jalapeno bacon. I used this magnificent pork product to make one of my favorite dishes so far on the smoker and I think I may be addicted. I actually found out about it through Artizone, a grocery site that sources artisan food products. They have delivery in the Dallas and Chicago areas but also nationwide shipping for those of you in other parts of the U.S. They did not pay me to say that; I just love them.

So, I went to the store with the idea that I would be buying 2 lbs of something that just looked like it should be wrapped in awesome bacon. Since I am averse to most forms of chicken, I scoped out the pork and beef sections and laid my eyes on these sweet things…

Sirloin

I usually avoid anything that has been pre-seasoned but these just had a bunch of cracked pepper on the sides and I love pepper. In the basket they went. I won’t preach to you about portions… okay, I’m gonna preach here a bit. It’ll be quick. Two pounds of meat equals eight weeknight servings in my house. We load the rest of our plates with veggies. (Weekends are a different story. Oh, and vacations — just ask my scale.) So I cut my four sirloins in half. Then I proceeded to wrap them in the bacon and secure with half a toothpick each.

Sirloin

I threw them on my 350-degree grill on indirect heat, which I chose to avoid bacon fat flare-ups.

Sirloin

I grilled them over indirect heat for about four minutes on each side and then finished them up over direct heat (400 degrees or so) for about two minutes per side. They looked something like this when I was done…

Sirloin

Dinner was served, y’all — and I barely broke a sweat.

Sirloin

Categories: Beef, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Stuffed Flank Steak

Flank steak is usually my first choice for fajitas or steak salads but sometimes I want to do something a little fancier with it. That’s when I go for this preparation. I tend to throw in whatever yummy stuff I have on hand for the stuffing but I never use bread crumbs. In my opinion, they don’t bring anything to the party in this particular case. Last night, I had a 1.5 lb. flank steak on hand and went scrounging in the fridge to see what might make it extra special.

My plan was to butterfly the flank steak and flatten it out like a book. You have to get a flank steak with pretty consistent thickness to make this work. Since I had purchased one that was rolled up in the packaging, I couldn’t see that my choice wasn’t ideal for this approach until I had it out on my board. This is where I should have considered just grabbing my mallet and pounding it out to an even 1/2-inch thickness. Instead, I doggedly stuck to Plan A and ended up with some holes that needed patching once I had finished butterflying it. A quick search of my deli drawer yielded the perfect solution: sliced ham!

Stuffed Flank Steak

(I would have used more but this was all the sammich meat I had.) Disaster averted, I mixed up the stuffing: 2 oz peppered goat cheese, 1/2 cup chopped sundried tomatoes, 1/3 cup chopped artichoke hearts, and 1 minced garlic clove.

Stuffed Flank Steak

Then I spread it over the flank steak, leaving about an inch boarder all around.

Stuffed Flank Steak

Then I rolled that sucker up tight like so…

Stuffed Flank Steak

Since my mangled steak needed a bit more support than usual, I was liberal in my use of butcher’s twine to tie it up:

Stuffed Flank Steak

I usually don’t throw in a tie lengthwise but it definitely helped keep all of the stuffing in place. I had some beeyootiful coals going in the Green Egg…

Stuffed Flank Steak

So I set my Egg up for indirect heat and put my flank steak on when the dome was about 500 degrees. I let it be for about 10 minutes and then flipped it.

Stuffed Flank Steak

After another 12 minutes, I removed it and let it rest for about five minutes, tented with foil. (FYI that mine was on the rare side so you might want to shoot for 30 minutes total.)

Stuffed Flank Steak

Then we sliced it up…

Stuffed Flank Steak

And plated it up with some summer veggies for a quick and delicious dinner.

Stuffed Flank Steak

Categories: Beef, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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